Posted tagged ‘savior’

The Shepherd’s Tale

December 29, 2014

I posted this poem and drawing a couple years back as my Christmas gift to you.  I haven’t written a Christmas poem since, so here it is again. Enjoy, edify, encourage.  Merry Christmas!

 

 

 A Shepherd’s Tale

The city below was hushed and dark,
and starlight lit the hill.
The sheep were sleeping soundly,
and the night around was still.

Then in the quiet came a light,
and we lay in awe and fear.
The angel of the Lord had come,
and we our dooms did wait to hear.

But he bade us be not frightened,
for his tidings were only good.
A savior had been born he said
in Bethlehem which nearby stood.

A sign he gave us ere he left
to help us know the child.
We’d find him wrapped in swaddling clothes
in a manger – and we smiled.

No sooner had he finished
than a multitude appeared,
who sang a song of praise and joy,
and then the heavens cleared.

A moment thus we sat and gaped
then one by one we stood.
We ran as one to find the babe,
and share these tidings good.

We found them, as the angel said,
and gathered round the manger.
With Mary and Joseph we worshiped there,
then ran to tell the neighbors.

Many heard but couldn’t believe
that shepherds such as we
Would ever have been favored so
that angels we should see.

So we went back to find our sheep
all there and sleeping still,
And many nights we sat and sang
the angels’ song upon the hill.

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My Christmas Gift to You!

December 25, 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Shepherd’s Tale

The city below was hushed and dark,
and starlight lit the hill.
The sheep were sleeping soundly,
and the night around was still.

Then in the quiet came a light,
and we lay in awe and fear.
The angel of the Lord had come,
and we our dooms did wait to hear.

But he bade us be not frightened,
for his tidings were only good.
A savior had been born he said
in Bethlehem which nearby stood.

A sign he gave us ere he left
to help us know the child.
We’d find him wrapped in swaddling clothes
in a manger – and we smiled.

No sooner had he finished
than a multitude appeared,
who sang a song of praise and joy,
and then the heavens cleared.

A moment thus we sat and gaped
then one by one we stood.
We ran as one to find the babe,
and share these tidings good.

We found them, as the angel said,
and gathered round the manger.
With Mary and Joseph we worshiped there,
then ran to tell the neighbors.

Many heard but couldn’t believe
that shepherds such as we
Would ever have been favored so
that angels we should see.

So we went back to find our sheep
all there and sleeping still,
And many nights we sat and sang
the angels’ song upon the hill.

MERRY CHRISTMAS!!!

My Savior and I

March 23, 2011

We walk among the scented fields
And sing together, songs of praise
I hear your laugh, I see your smile,
I know in you I’m always loved.

We walk along a troubled path;
The darkness round us cannot scare me
I hold your hand, I see your face,
I know in you I’m always safe.

We walk amid the tides of time
but you never let them flood my life
I hear your voice, I see your strength,
I know in you I’m always strong.

We walk apart from worldly cares
And you give to me a gladsome joy
I love your ways, I love your work,
I know in you I’ll always rest.

~Homeschoolgraduate

Thanksgiving

November 25, 2010

So, am I mixing holidays here?  I’ve been posting Easter pictures on Thanksgiving, and of course you’re all thinking, “What’s going on?”

The simple fact is that despite all the commercialism that Thanksgiving has got caught in (mostly commercialism attached to Christmas shopping!), and despite all the emphasis on the meal, today was originally about giving thanks to God for his blessings.

My mother, with her usual perfect timing, has been covering early American history with TJ and BP, my youngest brothers.  For the last few weeks I’ve been listening in to bits and pieces of Genevieve Foster’s “The World of Captain John Smith” and James Daugherty’s “The Landing of the Pilgrims.”  The Pilgrims had a lot to be thankful for when they began the tradition of getting together for a meal and a game.  Granted, in the early days, they furnished their own entertainment: footraces, jumping contests, and such like.  These days, after the turkey’s history (or mostly history anyway) we tend to head for the nearest TV set and watch someone else work hard on the football field.

The point is, we have much to be thankful for, just as much as the first celebrants, the Pilgrims and the Indians.  The Pilgrims had survived a harsh transition to a new world, and the Indians had made friends with the strange men who carried fearsome thunder-sticks (muskets).  Today, I’m thankful for the Pilgrims’ perseverance, because if they had not stuck to that little settlement and paved the way, it might have been years or decades before another group with enough tenacity came to build our nation.

I’m also thankful for the things which drove the Pilgrims here.  Most of that first band belonged to a small congregation that called themselves Separatists.  They disagreed with many of the practices and doctrines of the Church of England, so they went to Holland where they could worship God in a Biblical way.  After a few years with the Dutch, they made the decision to go to America, where they would be free from the influences of other religions.  Well, that’s what they thought anyway!

Sometimes I feel like a Pilgrim myself.  The rest of the time, I know I am one!  The two epistles that Peter wrote talk about the Heart Pilgrim.  As a Christian, I am a daughter of The King, and someday he will call me home.  That’s why I do not find it strange that I am drawn to the songs about heaven (check out post here).

And this brings me back to my original subject in this post.  Why am I thinking Easter thoughts on Thanksgiving?  It’s because the thing I’m most thankful for this Thanksgiving is my salvation.  I don’t belong to this world any longer.  I have another home in a world to come.  God sent his son to the cross to die in my place, to pay for all the times I’ve broken His law.  I should have been the one on that cross.  Instead, Jesus was.  But, as in the photo, He’s not on that cross anymore.  Nor is He in the tomb.  On the third day, He rose from the dead, and after appearing to many (over 400 people), He ascended to heaven to sit at God’s right hand until the time when He comes back to reign.

So why don’t I have a picture of Him sitting beside the throne?  Well, it would be pretty hard.  No one has seen Him there and come back to describe it (unless you count a few near-death experiences), let alone taken a camera with him (I think the shekinah glory would overpower any camera anyway)!  The other shots are representative anyway, but for this I didn’t feel right about using an approximation.  I can see it in my mind’s eye, but even there I am blinded by the glory of God.  My mental image isn’t clouded, it’s dazzled.

What are you thankful for this Thanksgiving?  The list usually includes family, friends, food, maybe even football!  I’m thankful for all of these too, but they are dwarfed by the thing my Savior did for me.

Perhaps you’ve never heard about the wonderful thing that God did.  Maybe you’ve never realized that Jesus came and paid the price for all the times you’ve broken His law (check out Exodus chapter 20 if you need a refresher on that).  Give it some thought today.  Yes, Jesus took your place too.  He is God after all, He can save the world, unlike most superheros.  But He won’t save us if we don’t want to be saved.  Saving us wouldn’t be worth it if all we did was grumble that we liked our old life better.  So He gives us a choice.  You have to ask.  And when you do, He takes care of the rest.

Now that’s something to give thanks for!

Power in the Blood

April 4, 2010

Resurrection Sunday

Isn’t it awesome to consider that God came down to earth in the form of a man, died though he did no wrong, and rose again the third day?  Easter is a time when Christians rejoice, and I’m as happy as any.

I’ve heard quite a few Easter sermons in my 21 years, but never one quite like the one I heard today.  My pastor taught on the man Peter.  You see, Christ didn’t just rise from the dead; he walked among the disciples for forty days (according to Acts chapter 1), and one of the things he did before ascending to the right hand of God in heaven was to reinstate Peter. 

You remember Peter, the disciple who denied the Lord three times.  Think about it.  How would you feel if you had told your hero/boss/leader that you would follow him to prison and death, and then later that same night, you denied that you even knew him?  I know I would feel unworthy to ever be called a disciple again. 

Chances are that Peter thought his ministry was over.  In fact, in John 21, Peter goes back to fishing.  It could be that he was just filling in time, but in the circumstances, it looks rather like he had given up on being a disciple.  He probably thought he’d crossed the line, gone too far for Jesus to take him back and use him.  Not that he did not believe anymore, just that he was not fit for use.

Jesus didn’t see it that way.  He asked Peter three times during one breakfast whether Peter loved him.  And each time Peter responded that he did, Christ commands him to “feed my lambs.”  Christ was telling Peter that he still had work for him to do.  We know that in Acts, on the day of Pentecost, Peter was the one who got up and explained to the confused multitude why his friends could talk and each man understand in his own language.  That’s a wonderful story in itself, but we’re talking about Peter.  Peter who made a big mistake, sinned greatly.  God could still use him, and he can still use you and me.

I’m no closer to perfect than any of you.  Nor am I any better than Peter, though I have not denied my Lord in the way that Peter did.  Maybe I don’t always claim the name of Christ either, though my denials may be more passive than active.  I make no secret of being a Christian when someone asks me, but sometimes I keep quiet about it and miss my chance to share my testimony.

What might have happened if Peter had claimed Christ in the courtyard of the high priest?  Might he have been thrown into prison?  Sure.  Might he have been killed also, perhaps by the kinsman of the man whose ear Peter had cut off?  Certainly.  Might someone have asked Peter why he followed Christ, allowing Peter to share some of the things Christ had done?  Absolutely. 

A host of “might haves” don’t get us any closer to Christ, though.  God is bigger than our pasts.  We can leave the past with him and move through the present toward the future.  With God as our strength, we can overcome, and we can be useful vessels again.

The resurrection power of Christ doesn’t end with raising us from our dead selves to life eternal.  He can also raise us when we fall into trouble, difficulty, and even sin, and he can make us more like himself.  It’s called sanctification, and he takes a human lifetime to work it out.  There’s a whole lot of power in the blood of Christ, both to save and to sanctify.


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